A Trauma-Informed Workplace

By | September 3rd, 2016|Uncategorized|

Getty Images By Travis Cronin, MCW, LCSW I began kindergarten in Portland, Oregon in 1983. My bus stop was across the street from my house and my mother would watch me from our front room window. I had two younger brothers at the time so my mother had plenty to distract her as she waited for me to get on the bus. One morning I was the only child at my bus stop. As I waited for the bus, a tall White man stopped his car, opened his door, got out, and approached me. He asked if I wanted a ride to school. I told him that I liked riding [...]

Are We There Yet?: Sexism, Racism, and Female Dominance in Rio

By | August 31st, 2016|Uncategorized|

By Mary Radcliffe, Ed.D. and Matthew C. Whitaker, Ph.D. As avid supporters of women and sports, we celebrated the dominance of American female athletes during the 2016 Olympics, notwithstanding Michael Phelps’ performance as one of the greatest swimmers of all time. However, media coverage of the Olympics left us questioning how far we still have to go in bringing humanity and equity to media coverage of women in sports. This topic has been the subject of intense debate among men and women reporting on the games.  Indeed, it is not a recent phenomenon. Sadly, Dottie Pepper, a retired L.P.G.A. player referred to the American women competing in the Solheim Cup as “choking [...]

Bayard Rustin, Identity and Inclusion

By | August 28th, 2016|Uncategorized|

By Michelle Dew August 28th marks the 53rd anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. We recognize this march as a major stepping-stone towards securing the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1965 and Voting Rights Act of 1965, as well as the platform from which Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his legendary “I Have a Dream” speech. Presented in front of 250,000 marchers and broadcasted live to thousands more on television, King cemented this moment in history with his vision for equality and freedom in the United States. Standing behind King was one of his most trusted and influential advisors, Bayard Rustin, the Deputy Director of the march. It [...]

“Backstrokin,” Self-Determination, and the 2016 U.S. Election

By | August 18th, 2016|Uncategorized|

The R&B and Funk band, Fatback, released the album Hot Box 1980.  The album set discos ablaze, scored several hit records, and gave early b-boys and b-girls crisp snares, thick bass, and electrophonic sounds to dance to.  “Backstroking” was arguably the most successful and widely quoted of the album’s hit tracks.  “Looking for the good stuff,” the artists asked, “why don’t you tighten up on your back stroke?”  The sexual innuendo is clear, but like many musical chef-d’oeuvres, there is a hidden transcript within Fatback’s pulsating melody.  The general tenor and tone of urban America, at the time of the release, was one of growing hopelessness and despair in the face of [...]

“Man Up”: Masculinity Messages, Imperfection and the Superman Complex

By | August 17th, 2016|Uncategorized|

"The improbability may henceforth be taken for granted of finding in Nature a sharp cleavage between all that is masculine on the one side and all that is feminine on the other; or that any living being is so simple in this respect that it can be put wholly on one side, or wholly on the other, of the line.” ~ Otto Weininger “Man up” and “Be a man” are phrases often used to socialize young boys into manhood, but what exactly do these missives mean?  Last fall, my partner and I embarked on a qualitative research project that examined how men remember being acculturated into manhood.  Our study revealed that these [...]

Free to Be You and Me

By | July 4th, 2016|Uncategorized|

There's a land that I see where the children are free And I say it ain't far to this land from where we are Take my hand, come with me, where the children are free Come with me, take my hand, and we'll live In a land where the river runs free In a land through the green country In a land to a shining sea And you and me are free to be you and me ~ The New Seekers My mother, the educator, activist, and child advocate that she is, made singing this tune a part of our daily routine after it was released in 1974.  “Free to Be You [...]

Growing Your Community Bank Account

By | June 20th, 2016|Uncategorized|

In 2004, Steven R. Covey published The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, a runaway bestseller and trailblazing leadership manifesto.   The book promised to provide a “holistic, integrated, principle-centered” method for “solving personal and professional problems.”  It delivered.  Despite selling 15 million copies, however, many aspiring and seasoned leaders have yet to unlock the fullness of its potential.  This is particularly true in light of the ever-expanding distrust of authority, recent Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter Movements, and the associated and intensifying condemnation of homogenous an inequitable leadership, workforces, office cultures, and political and education environs.  In particular, many influencers have not done enough to invest and grow what Covey [...]

Orlando and the Pulse of this Nation

By | June 12th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Unprecedented demographic change, made possible by our documents of freedom, and forged in our crucible of constant immigration and cultural difference, continues to make the United States one of the most diverse nations on earth. Chauvinism and Orwellian insecurity, and the finger pointing fear, angst and emotional stress that they engender, also make us one of the most intolerant and violent. Our propensity to use deadly force, especially against the vulnerable and marginalized, such as the Orlando LGBT community that was devastated yesterday by a homophobic, religious extremist, and his assault rifle, is both an abrogation of our espoused commitment to freedom and autonomy, and an acute reflection of our longstanding love [...]

Muhammad Ali: Worthy of All Praise

By | June 12th, 2016|Uncategorized|

As we mourn the loss of Muhammad Ali, let us also celebrate his life and legacy. As I wrote in the forward to the Butterfly Ball: A National Tribute to Muhammad Ali in 2005, we must also “recognize and appreciate the extent to which Ali and his legacy represents the spirit and essence of Black history and life.” Indeed, as I and others have noted, Ali declared himself “The Greatest,” and for millions of people of African descent, and millions of others, he became just that. Ali embodied the complexity, immensity, and dynamism that characterized Black communities around the world, and his leadership was a testament to the ability of one man [...]

Recognizing and Advancing Positively Powerful Women

By | June 6th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Women have made significant inroads in governance and management in the last 40 years.  According to labor specialists Mark Brenner and Stephanie Luce, “Legal barriers to gender-based employment and pay discrimination” have been eliminated.  “By 1970, occupational segregation by gender began to fall substantially for the first time since at least the turn of the century.  The gender wage gap narrowed, with women earning 59 cents an hour to every dollar earned by a man in 1964, but 77 cents per hour in 2004. The percentage of women in the labor force with a college degree went up from 11.2 percent in 1970 to 32.6 percent in 2004, rising at basically twice [...]

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