“Inspiring, Achieving, and Celebrating Inclusion”

Black America and World War II 

Saturday, December 16, 2017
(9:00am to 12:00pm)

Register Today

Continental Breakfast and Parking in the CityScape West Parking Lot Validation Included

(Led by award-winning historian, educator, and speaker,  Dr. Matthew C. Whitaker)
Learn what you have always wanted to know in an intimate and positive space!

“Inspiring, Achieving, and Celebrating Inclusion”
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By Diamond Strategies

Please join us for our next Culture Quest on December 16, 2017.  The topic will be Black America and World War II.  In “African-Americans fighting fascism and racism, from WWII to Charlottesville,” historian Matthew Delmont reminds us that “in July 1943, one month after a race riot shook Detroit…The Pittsburgh Courier, a leading African-American newspaper at the time, praised [Vice President Henry] Wallace for endorsing what they called the ‘Double V’ campaign. The Double Victory campaign, launched by the Courier in 1942, became a rallying cry for black journalists, activists and citizens to secure both victory over fascism abroad during World War II and victory over racism at home.  There is a historical relationship between Nazism and white supremacy in the United States. Yet the recent resurgence of explicit racism, including the attack in Charlottesville, has been greeted by many with surprise.  But collective amnesia has consequences. When Americans celebrate the country’s victory in WWII, but forget that the U.S. armed forces were segregated, that the Red Cross segregated blood donors or that many black WWII veterans returned to the country only to be denied jobs or housing, it becomes all the more difficult to talk honestly about racism today.”

Over 1 million Black men and women served in the U.S. Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard during World War II.  Their valor in the face of segregation, discrimination, and danger overseas, was matched only by their commitment to defeat the hypocrisy and horrors of White supremacy and racism at home.  Diamond Strategies will explore the exigencies of Black life and military service during World War II, during our next Quest, and facilitate an accessible and honest conversation about their legacy, while providing a blueprint for learning and operationalizing the period’s lessons that remain illusive.

Anyone interested in leveraging the indispensable power of Black history and life, particularly aspiring and established leaders, on behalf of transformational change, will not want to miss this opportunity.

Previous and Future Quest Dates and Themes:

9/2          Pre-Colonial Africa
9/16        The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
9/30        American Slavery
10/14      Emancipation and Reconstruction
10/28      The Rise of Jim Crow
11/18      Black America and the “New Deal”
12/2       The Harlem Renaissance
12/16     Black America and World War II
12/30     The Civil Rights Movement
1/13       Black Millennial America

Diamond Strategies enables individuals and organizations to expand their horizons, and enhance their diversity and inclusion efforts, with timely, dynamic, solutions-based learning, in a C-Suite setting.  Designed for professionals and non-traditional learners who wish to remain culturally competent and up-to-speed without enrolling in college courses, Culture Quests are your opportunity to learn from top professionals and practitioners in an intimate, comfortable, and convenient setting. Our Quests facilitate appreciation for diversity, promote mutual respect, energizes participants, and advances civic participation and nimble leadership.

Questions? Contact Diamond Strategies

Feature image: Tuskegee Airmen AP #110928085577; Second images-Somewhere in England Major Charity E. Adams and Captain Abbie N. Campbell, first contingent of Black members of the WAC Corps assigned to overseas (National Archives, Holt 111-SC-20079 Image 149; Tuskegee Airman, Entrepreneur, and activist, Dr. Lincoln J. Ragsdale (Center) posing with other “Red Tail” pilots, circa 1944; Dorie Miller, portrayed by actor Cuba Gooding, Jr., in the film Pearl Harbor, AP #AP4206101448.

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