The Rise of Jim Crow

Saturday, October 28, 2017
(9:00am to 12:00pm)

“Inspiring, Achieving, and Celebrating Inclusion”
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Continental Breakfast and Parking in the CityScape West Parking Lot Validation Included

(Led by award-winning historian, educator, and speaker,  Dr. Matthew C. Whitaker)
Learn what you have always wanted to know in an intimate and positive space!

“Inspiring, Achieving, and Celebrating Inclusion”
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By Diamond Strategies

Mark Twain has been credited as saying “history doesn’t repeat itself, but it rhymes.”  This is particularly true with regard to the cyclical nature of our nation’s often retrograde inter-personal and institutional racial relations.  We are looking and behaving more like the America of 1917, than the America of 2017 that many of us have hoped to see.  In fact, De jure segregation may be history, but de facto segregation, and the attitudes that fuel it, are alive and well.   Indeed, recent and not-so-recent- events have reminded us that Michelle Alexander’s New Jim Crow is merely a modern iteration of the old.  Current social, economic, political, and cultural conflict is tethered to a not-so-distant past that many of us know very little if anything about.  Most of our limited knowledge is anecdotal, and thus insufficient to provide needed context and inspire effective solutions to disrupt the millennial offspring of what historian C. Vann Woodward called The Strange Career of Jim Crow.

According to PBS.org, “The segregation and disenfranchisement laws known as ‘Jim Crow’ represented a formal, codified system of racial apartheid that dominated the American South for three quarters of a century beginning in the 1890s. The laws affected almost every aspect of daily life, mandating segregation of schools, parks, libraries, drinking fountains, restrooms, buses, trains, and restaurants. ‘Whites Only,’ ‘Colored,’ [and ‘No Dogs, Mexican, Negroes, or Jews’] signs were constant reminders of the enforced racial order.”

“In legal theory, blacks received separate but equal’ treatment under the law — in actuality, public facilities for blacks were nearly always inferior to those for whites, when they existed at all. In addition, blacks were systematically denied the right to vote in most of the rural South through the selective application of literacy tests and other racially motivated criteria.  The Jim Crow system was upheld by local government officials and reinforced by acts of terror perpetrated by vigilantes.”  Sound familiar?  Do you hear the rhyme?  “It would take several decades of legal action and months of nonviolent direct action” to bring about positive change, but here we are again, dealing with the legacy of the old Jim Crow, while simultaneously navigating the new.  This time Culture Quest will explore The Rise of [the original] Jim Crow and why its lasting effects are still being felt.

This Quest will allow the unheard to speak, inspire, and instruct our way forward.  Anyone interested in leveraging the indispensable power of Black history and life, particularly aspiring and established leaders, on behalf of transformational change, will not want to miss this opportunity.  Indeed, this Quest will explore the social, political, economic, cultural, and religious experiences of people of African descent in America.  We will pay particular attention to the ways in which Black people have resisted forces that sought to dehumanize and marginalize them throughout their ongoing quest for freedom and democracy.

Previous and Future Quest Dates and Themes:

9/2          Pre-Colonial Africa
9/16        The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
9/30        American Slavery
10/14      Emancipation and Reconstruction
10/28      The Rise of Jim Crow
11/18      Black America and the “New Deal”
12/2       The Harlem Renaissance
12/16     Black America and World War II
12/30     The Civil Rights Movement
1/13       Black Millennial America

Diamond Strategies enables individuals and organizations to expand their horizons, and enhance their diversity and inclusion efforts, with timely, dynamic, solutions-based learning, in a C-Suite setting. Designed for professionals and non-traditional learners who wish to remain culturally competent and up-to-speed without enrolling in college courses, Culture Quests are your opportunity to learn from top professionals and practitioners in an intimate, comfortable, and convenient setting. Our Quests facilitate appreciation for diversity, promotes mutual respect, energizes participants, and advances civic participation and nimble leadership.

Images: Feature, Live Museum of the New South; “America First,” “America for Whites,” wwwfloridamemorycom; “I AM A MAN,” Bob Adelman/Corbis, Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University; “No, Dogs, No Negroes, No Mexicans,” and well as “No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs,” Black History Collection, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.

Questions? Contact Diamond Strategies