Emancipation and Reconstruction

A heritage to which our young people would be proud.  Proud to know how their fathers and grandfathers handled their brief day of power, during the Reconstruction period.  Yet, most of this history is buried in oblivion.” ~ Ida B. Wells-Barnett

Saturday, October 14, 2017
(9:00am to 12:00pm)

“Inspiring, Achieving, and Celebrating Inclusion”
Register Today

Continental Breakfast and Parking in the CityScape West Parking Lot Validation Included

(Led by award-winning historian, educator, and speaker,  Dr. Matthew C. Whitaker)
Learn what you have always wanted to know in an intimate and positive space!

Our next Quest will take place on Saturday, October 14,  2017, from 9am to Noon.  Our focus will be Emancipation and Reconstruction.  Historians James L. Roark and Michael P. Johnson, remind us in The American Promise that “a new chapter in American history was inaugurated following the Civil War by Northern and Southern politicians, newly freed [black people], and average American citizens.  The North was victorious in combat, and as the Thirteenth Amendment, passed on December 18, 1865, was implemented, it abolished slavery in the United States.”  Despite having won the military conflict, however, the North continued to be faced with a sobering reality.  Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, and did not bring about an end to contending ideologies which had already ignited the fires of war.”

“One nineteenth century observer noted that ‘cannons conquer, but they do not necessarily convert,’ Roark and Johnson stress, as “former slaveholders faced the bewildering fact of emancipation with everything from concern, to fury, to despair.  Indeed, the South had not been converted.  Most Southerners continued to believe that blacks were inferior and that slavery was acceptable.  Following the Civil War, Southerners sought to ‘redeem’ the South and force black people into a state of virtual slavery.”  “The twelve years following the Civil War,” writes Digital History, engendered  vast consequences for the nation’s future.”   Ramifications that we continue to confront today.  “Reconstruction helped set the pattern for future race relations and defined the federal government’s role in promoting,” and undermining, “racial equality.”  One cannot understand modern America, without understanding Emancipation and Reconstruction.

This Quest will allow the unheard to speak, inspire, and instruct our way forward.  Anyone interested in leveraging the indispensable power of Black history and life, particularly aspiring and established leaders, on behalf of transformational change, will not want to miss this opportunity.  Indeed, this Quest will explore the social, political, economic, cultural, and religious experiences of people of African descent in America.  We will pay particular attention to the ways in which Black people have resisted forces that sought to dehumanize and marginalize them throughout their ongoing quest for freedom and democracy.  We began with pre-colonial Africa and the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and are now moving through the emancipation and reconstruction eras.

We will then explore migration processes, and the cultivation of Black organizations and leaders, and associated protest movements, focusing particularly on faith, race, class, and gender within Black communities, and the emergence of Black culture as a powerful force in global society.

Previous and Future Quest Dates and Themes:

9/2          Pre-Colonial Africa
9/16        The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
9/30        American Slavery
10/14      Emancipation and Reconstruction
10/28      The Rise of Jim Crow
11/18      Black America and the “New Deal”
12/2       The Harlem Renaissance
12/16     Black America and World War II
12/30     The Civil Rights Movement
1/13       Black Millennial America

Diamond Strategies enables individuals and organizations to expand their horizons, and enhance their diversity and inclusion efforts, with timely, dynamic, solutions-based learning, in a C-Suite setting. Designed for professionals and non-traditional learners who wish to remain culturally competent and up-to-speed without enrolling in college courses, Culture Quests are your opportunity to learn from top professionals and practitioners in an intimate, comfortable, and convenient setting. Our Quests facilitate appreciation for diversity, promotes mutual respect, energizes participants, and advances civic participation and nimble leadership.

Questions? Contact Diamond Strategies

Feature Image: American School, “Come and Join Us Brothers,” FineArtAmerica.com; iStock; Diamond Strategies’ Culture Quest participants; Shutterstok.
Sources: James L. Roark and Michael P. Johnson, The American Promise and “Overview of Reconstruction,” in Digital History.